Driving down Western Australia’s South Coast, I realised there’s so much more in Australia’s largest state that needs to be seen! If I’m being really honest, whenever I’ve thought of travel around WA, outside of Perth, I’ve only ever thought of travelling around the Kimberley and Broome – what a naive thought!

Travelling from Perth to Denmark, I was constantly in awe of the natural landscapes. This region is so diverse, you go from barren desert, to crystal clear surfing oasis, to dense giant tree canopies in a matter of minutes!

The direct route from Perth to Denmark takes about 5 hours, however if you have extra time, it’s definitely worth making a few pit stops along the way (or overnight stops to allow for maximum exploration). Here are some of my favourite sites from WA’s South Coast that you need to include on a roadtrip of the area:

Busselton

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Just 2.5 hours south of Perth is the relaxed coastal town of Busselton. Known as the ‘gateway to the Margaret River region’, Busselton is a luscious area where sun, surf, gourmet food and craft beer are a way of life.

With over 30km of coast, Busselton is a dream come true if you’re a lover of water sports and activities. From snorkelling and diving, to water-skiing, kayaking, fishing and wind-surfing, these are just some of the activities that are available year-round!

Of course, the major drawcard for Busselton is its famous jetty. Measuring 1.8 kilometres in length, the heritage-listed jetty is the longest timber-piled jetty in the Southern Hemisphere. You can stroll down the jetty and admire the turquoise waters beneath you, or if walking isn’t your thing, there’s a passenger train. If you catch the train, you’ll disembark out the front of the underwater observatory, where you can see what lives beneath the surface without having to don on a wetsuit and diving gear. Just remember to walk a little bit further to the end of the jetty so you can snap a few selfies ‘out at sea’.

Margaret River

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The Margaret River region in WA is most well known for its wine production. In fact, 15% of Australia’s premium wines are produced from grapes in the region. You’d need at least a week of hardcore winery-hopping to make a dent in the 100+ wineries in the area. Or, if you’re not much of a wine-o, there are plenty of restaurants, boutique beer breweries, art galleries and fresh produce stores (think fresh cheeses and chocolates – yum!).

When you’re not over-indulging in all of the food, wine and beer, you can burn those calories on one (or many) of the adventure sports available. With a coastline that spans over 100kms (the Margaret River wine region is the only area in Australia where you can hop from winery to beach to forest to ancient rock dwellings in a matter of minutes), there are plenty of top notch surf beaches for you to choose from. Other popular sports and activities in the region include rock-climbing, abseiling, mountain biking, canoeing and whale watching.

If you’re unsure of where to start your wine-adventure, I would recommend the Evans and Tate Winery. My opinion may be biased – they’re my favourite wine-makers AND they have the cuuuutest wine labels!

Pemberton

An hour and a half southeast of Margaret River is Pemberton; the town of towering timber. Set in Karri Tree Country, Pemberton is home to the world’s tallest fire lookout tree – the Gloucester Tree. If you’re feeling game, you can climb the tree and take in the awesome forest view from the top!

Denmark

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Just over a two hour drive southeast of Pemberton is Denmark; a seriously underrated town on WA’s south coast that hasn’t quite yet reached the radar of tourists. If you’re into Aussie films, you might recognise the scenery in Denmark from the 2017 film ‘Breath’, the movie adaptation of Tim Winton’s book of the same name.

I had no idea what to expect of Denmark, but upon arrival I immediately fell in love. The small coastal town is super chill, popular for surfing, but also many other activities sports and nature enthusiasts will enjoy. If you’re tight for time or not sure where to start, these are my top recommendations of not-to-miss activities:

Elephant Rocks and Greens Pool

Just 15km west of Denmark, you can find Elephant Rocks and Greens Pool – and let me tell you, they are absolutely stunning!

As the name suggests, Elephant Rocks got its name from the rocks that look like a herd of elephants paddling in the shallow waters. Getting to the rocks is easy, it’s a short 10-minute walk from the Greens Pool car park and is signed all the way. You can also follow the staircase down to Elephant Cove to view the rocks from a different perspective.

Adjacent to Elephant Rocks is Greens Pool; a perfect little ocean oasis. It’s the perfect place to spend the day floating in the crystal-clear waters, as the waves of the Southern Ocean are completely blocked off by big rocks. It’s also great for snorkelling, as there are lots of fish around the coral that surrounds the rocks.

Wineries

I was surprised by how many wineries there are in the Denmark region. Although, it makes sense – the Mediterranean-like temperature is perfect for grape harvesting! Again, it would take a couple of days of hardcore-hopping to visit all the wineries, however a standout for me was Castelli Wines. A bit of an underdog in comparison to other big name wineries near by, Castelli’s produced a great cab sav and one of the best sparkling wines I’ve ever tasted!

Bartholomews Meadery

While the roads around Denmark are lined with many different sweet treat type stores, a unique standout for me was Bartholomews Meadery. This family-run store specialises in all things honey: skin care, mead, ice cream and of course honey. There’s a glass beehive where you can spot the queen bee and watch as the rest of the bees do their thing. While I was told the chocolate honey ice cream is the best flavour, my pick was the passionfruit honey ice cream – sooo good!

 

Of course, beyond Denmark there is still a further 1500km of coastline to explore in WA, but for a short 3-5 day break from Perth, a trip to the state’s South West Coast is a must!

As an Australian, it’s always interesting to hear what other people think of when imagining my homeland. Often it seems, people associate Australia with unattainably attractive surfers, red dirt, ‘shrimp on the barbie’ (which is perplexing, considering the fact we call ‘shrimp’ prawns out here) and having Kangaroos as pets (I swear if I had $1 for every time someone had asked me if I ride a Kangaroo to school/work…). Even as an Australian myself, I find that I too have some stereotypical ideas for what each part of the country looks like.

On a recent trip I took to Darwin, I was surprised to see that upon landing, Darwin was more like a tropical oasis – a small city surrounded by breezy blue waters (that you can’t swim in due to crocodiles and sharks – such a tease in the hot weather!) and loads of luscious green shrubbery; not the barren red landscape I’d always imagined it to be!
Despite the fact that I’ve grown up in Australia, it was being in Darwin that made me realise just how diverse and expansive my country is. How was it possible that only hours earlier I was in cold, rainy Sydney and a short 4-hour plane ride later had me in sub-tropical Darwin?

Maybe it was the element of surprise that won me over, or the lack of expectations I had for the city, or maybe even a combination of the two. I found that the more time I spent there, the more I enjoyed being there. The only problem was though, that I was there during the tail end of the wet season, so many tourists attractions were closed. However, this certainly didn’t stop me from having fun!

Whether you’re visiting the Top End during the wet season, or simply want to go where the tourists aren’t in the dry season, here is a list of some of my favourite Darwin activities:

Parap Village Markets
There’s no need to lose sleep over the fact that the Myndal Markets don’t run during the wet season (or are ridiculously over-crowded during the dry season), when you discover the less-touristy Parap Markets. Located just 7 minutes (driving) from Darwin’s CBD, this market, which is held every Saturday, is a great spot to try many different cuisines and nab a few bargains.

Picnic at the Waterfront
Pack a picnic and head out to the Waterfront. Darwin’s Waterfront is a great spot to spend an entire day with the family. With a wave-pool, swimming area, plenty of dining options, grassy shaded areas and views; you’ll be spoilt with options on how to use your time!

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Sunset at Darwin’s Waterfront

Litchfield National Park
Located only a 90-minute drive from the city; a day spent at Litchfield National Park is a must! Experience the outback on the drive out – ten minutes outside of the city, you’ll be driving down red-dusted roads at 130km per hour! Then, experience a whole new level of something else from within the park. Some highlights include the Magnetic Termite Mounds, Tolmer Falls and Wangi Plunge Pool.

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Tolmer Falls

Catch a Sunset
When in Darwin, watching a seaside sunset kind of goes without saying. While most people flock to the Myndal Markets to watch the sunset and gobble down a kebab, some other (less crowded and equally appeasing) sunset watching locations include Cullen Bay, Nightcliff and the Waterfront.

 

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Nightcliff

Stroll in the Park
There are so many parks within walking distance of the city. It’s a nice way to chill out and explore a new area. I particularly enjoyed spending a morning walking up the Esplanade and through Bicentennial Park.

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Bicentennial Park

If come the end of the weekend you still have some time up your sleeve, some other notable activities (that I’ve had to put on my ‘to do when I return’ list) include:

WWII Memorials.
Despite being the capital of the Northern Territory, prior to WWII, Darwin was more like a small country town. However, due to its strategic positioning in northern Australia, both the Royal Australian Navy and Royal Australian Air Force constructed bases near the capital in the 1930’s. In the early stages of the Second World War, Darwin played a key role in the South Pacific air ferry route. As the Pacific War broke out, defence in Darwin was strengthened and the city became an Allied Base for the defence of the Netherlands East Indies. Between 1942-43, there were over 100 air raids against Australia. On the 19th February 1942, 242 Japanese aircrafts attacked the town of Darwin, ships in the harbour and two airfields in an attempt to prevent the allies from using them as bases to contest the invasion of Timor and Java. This was the largest single attack ever mounted by a foreign power in Australia, and has been since known as the Bombing of Darwin.

Within the city of Darwin and its surrounds, there are lots of WWII Tourist Sites that can be visited. Including gun emplacements, oil storage tunnels, bunkers, military airstrips and lookout posts. Most of these places are easily accessible and free of charge.

Jumping Crocodile Cruise
A one-hour drive out of Darwin will land you at the location of the ‘Jumping Crocodile Cruise’. A great way to see crocodiles up close, the Jumping Crocodile Cruise takes groups of people down their privately owned stretch of the Adelaide River for a real up-close and personal experience.

Aboriginal Culture
Immerse yourself in the regions indigenous culture. There is so much art, history and beliefs that we can learn from the lands traditional owners. Visit a locally owned art gallery or take a tour of the city with an Indigenous guide.

 

Whenever you travel, it’s somewhat expected that you’ll head straight to the major tourist attractions at your destination. As a travel blogger, those expectations are even higher, as reviews are assumed from everywhere you go.
I’ve never been that way though.
Rather, I prefer (to an extent) avoiding the big sights and instead getting to know the community with which I have temporarily become a part of. I figure, by travelling this way, I am able to share and provide my peers with more honest and insightful feedback and stories.

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Welcome to Paradise; Hideaway Island Resort

My recent trip to Vanuatu was much the same. If I’m being honest, I actually entered the country with absolutely no expectations or great desires to visit the ‘must-see’ sites – I was there for a friends wedding, what I was seeking was simply some time to relax and get back home. Upon landing and arriving at my hotel in the South Pacific Island, I became overwhelmed with loneliness. I mentioned this trip was for a wedding, what I didn’t mention was that I was going completely alone. The rest of the wedding party were on a cruise (a phobia of the open sea meant that that wasn’t an option for me) and Henry wasn’t able to join me as he had university commitments. Honeymooning couples and families surrounded me, as did advertisements targeted at honeymooning couples and families – it became very clear that this wasn’t a common destination for the solo traveller. Alas, I still had another 5 days to go, so I sucked in my utter loneliness and owned my solo-ness as I sat at my table-for-one dinner.

~

It had become apparent to me that Vanuatu, similar to a lot of Australia’s neighbouring countries thrives off of the tourism that Aussie’s provide them with. How Vanuatu differed though, was that despite the exploitation, the local people were amongst some of the friendliest people I’ve ever had the pleasure to be around. Everywhere I went I was always welcomed with a huge, heart-warming smile. Despite being warned, I wasn’t harassed at all.

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Local divers are employed in Vanuatu by the Sustainable Reef Supplies (SRS) to save and maintain the Coral Reefs.

So what do I think of Vanuatu as a holiday destination?
Vanuatu has a lot to offer. It is probably best known for its appeal as a honeymoon island, but there is so much beyond that everyone can enjoy. My only advice would be to be mindful of the locals. While Port Vila and its immediate surrounds are very touristy and seem luxurious, Vanuatu as a country is actually one of the least developed countries in the South Pacific.

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Where the locals meet; ‘Gambling Shelter and Go For Food 20VT’.

A walk I went on with a local through the village reinforced just how undeveloped Vanuatu really is. The local school had been depleted in Cyclone Pam, so classes were taught in tents, with little to no ventilation. Electricity was sparse. And employment is so limited that it’s not uncommon for family members to leave their families for months on end each year to do seasonal work in Australia.

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The local school. Clothes line surrounded by classrooms. Building at centre and to the right are in the process of being built after Cyclone Pam.

Despite all of this though, as I walked through the village, the happy sound of children laughing filled the air. There’s something so touching about the resilience of people despite the circumstances. While my stay in Vanuatu was only short, it was incredibly moving. It reinforced my gratitude and reminded me of what’s really important – family and health. Just as I’d felt overwhelmed upon entering the country, leaving the country was much the same. While I wasn’t feeling overwhelmed by loneliness, this time I was overwhelmed by a bittersweet sadness. I was sad to leave, but felt happy, as my heart had filled with love for the boldness of the people I’d been surrounded by.

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Wandering the streets of Mele Village. Mango trees align the streets and you can grab a cold beer if you want one!

 

 

 

 

To Stay or Not to Stay

Staycation /steɪˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/ noun: A vacation that is spent at one’s home enjoying all that home and one’s home environs have to offer.

 

When I first learned that there were people who actually took time out of their lives to stay at home and do nothing, I thought they were all mad. Why wouldn’t you go out and explore?! – Utilise your spare time experiencing something new. The idea of a stay-cation had never really appealed to me. Any time that I got off was spent going somewhere new and experiencing life and the world with a new set of eyes.

Oh how things change.

Fast-forward some time, to a time where the unfathomable “real world” has made itself uncomfortably comfortable in my every life and has so perceptibly changed the ways in which I view so many things. This year has seen the introduction of the mundane 9-5 slog, which combined with other life-happenings leaves me with little time to myself at the end of each week. So by the time the weekend rolls around, my body feels like it enters a non-conforming state to my active, wanting-to-wander mind. Typically, the mind trumps the body, but for the first time in my life EVER, I let my body win the battle this past weekend. And boy did it feel good!

Everyone has that list of things that they want to get done, but never finds the time (or makes the time) to do it. Enter the stay-cation. Whilst it may seem like the most Nanna-activity ever, once you’ve made the decision to let lazy win, you won’t be disappointed! I put my gallivanting mind to rest for one weekend and had a blast! My first day of freedom was spent doing things around the house that I had never had time to do. I went to a yoga class, potted some succulents and moved the TV into the bedroom (just for the weekend – I swear!) and binged on chick flicks. Day two of the stay-cation was a little more active and saw me head out to my favourite local markets, explore the greenery at Minnamurra Rainforest and indulge in some hot chips at my favourite diner in cute seaside town Kiama.

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Held on the 4th Sunday of every month, the Coledale Markets are a great day that everyone can enjoy. How could you not with this as a backdrop and the ocean at the forefront?!

 

Nature in all its glory at Minnamurra rainforest

 

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Lunch with a view – Little Blow Hole, Kiama

 

Whilst past me would be horrified to hear of present me’s actions (or lack thereof) this past weekend, it did make me realise how important it is to put aside some time for a little TLC every now and then. If you’ve been contemplating taking some time out, telling all your friends you’re busy and doing sweet FA, I’d advise you to do it! Bask in the gloriousness that is contempt laziness in this fast, routine world! If my little revelation hasn’t convinced you, let these 5 points ice the cake for you:

5 reasons why taking time out for a stay-cation is great

 

  1. Been eyeing off a cute pair of pj’s at the shops lately, or just been hanging out to wear your favourite onesie again? This is the perfect opportunity! When disembarking on a stay-cation, remaining in your pj’s is like the number 1 unbreakable rule.
  2.  Drinking wine in bed, eating chocolates and watching endless chick flicks is ok – Hoorah!
  3. Perfect op to research the crap out of where your next big adventure will be …. After you’ve rested up that is.
  4. You’re only going to be at home all weekend, so any reason for wearing make-up, showering or even getting out of bed is diminished.
  5. Remember that time, before life got busy when you actually had hobbies? Now’s the perfect time to rekindle that love for crocheting you forgot you had.

 

 

 

 

Hikes around Sydney – Wodi Wodi Track

For those of you who don’t know, I currently live and have grown up around the city of Sydney, Australia. For a very long time, I took my local landscape and all it has to offer for granted. In fact, a couple of years ago, I had convinced myself into believing that I detested Sydney and that I didn’t belong in Australia; I was meant to be American. A very naïve concept created by teenage-me. However, since travelling extensively alone and with friends over the past 5 years, I have grown to really appreciate my home country and city. Australia is such a vast and unique country with so much to offer!

Like most people do at the end of year, I sat down and reflected upon 2015 and was not happy with how I had utilised the time I had granted to me. It felt as if I’d spent the year in hiding, rather then going out and being the spontaneous, happy-go-lucky girl that I’m known to be. So, whilst I’m not usually a fan of New Years Resolutions, after being disappointed with my 2015 reflections, I decided that 2016 would be the year I get out more. Let my hair down and stop taking everything so seriously! Who cares what people think; who cares if I haven’t started on my career yet – 2016 will be the year that I put myself first. After all ….. YOLO!

So as to get my New Years Resolution into motion, I want to combine my getting out more with the premier of the Tourist in my own City series. TIMOC is going to be a showcase on the great city of Sydney and its surrounds and all that it has to offer. It’ll include things like my favourite markets, beaches, hikes, café’s, bars and much, much more. If there’s anything that you’d like to know about, please let me know!

Drumroll please …… so, for the first post in the Tourist in my own City series, I want to share with you guys one of the many hikes that there on offer around Sydney – the Wodi Wodi Track in Stanwell Park.

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The starting point of the Wodi Wodi Track at Coalcliff, NSW.

Stanwell Park is just over an hour south of Sydney. The super quaint main street is filled with several little café’s and boutique stores. There are a few starting points for the Wodi Wodi. You can either start at the Stanwell Park train station, or if you are heading up from the South, just past Coalcliff station on the left side of the road is a little pull-in where you can park your car and start hiking. I started from Coalcliff. I’d done some research and knew that the hike that goes around the escarpment would take about three hours. Henry and I packed a bag with some snacks (granola bars, dried apricots etc) and filled a 3L water backpack. First note: 3L of water to share between 2 people and a few snacks aren’t enough. If you’re considering doing this hike, learn from my mistakes and pack at least 3L of water per person and a lot more than 2 tiny snacking items.

The Wodi Wodi track is a really great hike if you’re not afraid of going off of the beaten track! You become part of the rainforest-like escarpment in this hike, with the only form of a footpath to follow being flattened grass from previous walkers. Or when it gets a bit confusing, look out for the red ribbons and yellow arrows – they will save your life!

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However, that being said, if you come across a fork near the train line, take the beaten looking path; the nice looking one will lead you to someone’s horse pasture – woops. Also, about half way through the hike, there is one yellow arrow that points downwards, towards rubble. When you see the huge slide of debris, don’t be like Henry and I and try to slay your way through the bush. You will get ticks and leeches (trust me). Instead, be smart. When you see the arrow pointing in a strange direction, and the thought ‘well that seems odd’ pops into your head, listen to it! Look around and you will see another yellow arrow to your right pointing you in the direction of a bush path.

Having survived (just) three months riding a motorbike and camping around North America, I would’ve liked to think that Henry and I had better senses of direction. Although, the several misadventures on this hike would probably lead one to believe that we were a lost cause. (Just for the record, I’m going to put in here that Henry was in charge of direction :p )

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Water! We were so happy to find this little pool and the waterfall that was nearby. We dunked our heads in and it felt so good!

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A nice spot to eat our snacks 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whilst we did get lost a few times, and the Australian summer heat became unbearable at some points, the views looking out onto the ocean from on top of the escarpment were amazing and made the sweat, leeches and ticks well worth it!

 

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Trying to look excited having just finished hiking for three hours. I was exhausted! But pumped! – We did it!

Whether you’re celebrating Valentine’s Day with your significant other, a bunch of gal pals or your dog (we travellers aren’t the judging type), spending a great deal of money on a Hallmark Holiday is not ideal. Especially when there are so many free (and beats the V-day crowd) activities that are loads of fun and can be enjoyed solo, as part of a two-man team or amongst a group.
Forget paying way too much on a fancy dinner; instead pack a picnic and head out on a romantic adventure to one of these top spots in Sydney.

 

  1. Figure 8 Pools – Royal National Park

 

First things first, check that it’s low tide before planning to go out to the Figure 8 Pools. These pools are the perfect place to relax amongst the bush, cliffs and ocean. To get there is about a one-hour walk through the bush from the closest car park. Make sure you pack plenty of sunscreen and lots of nibbles and water!

 

  1. Seacliff Bridge – Grand Pacific Drive

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Such an amazing day! 🌴🌻☀️

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Hop in the car/on your motorbike and head south of Sydney and onto the Grand Pacific Drive. This is one of my favourite drives; I often drive this way home from Sydney rather than the highway. The Grand Pacific drives takes you through the rainforest of the Royal National Park, to the Coastal Escarpment, to many beaches and several lookout points. A highlight is definitely the famous Sea Cliff Bridge where you can often see migrating whales in whaling season. One of my favourite picnic spots on this drive is at Bald Hill, looking onto the Bridge and the escarpment and ocean around it.

 

  1. Mrs Macquarie’s Point – Sydney

 

If you don’t fancy going outside of the city but still want something special to do, then a Sydney sunrise overlooking the stunning Sydney Harbour should definitely fit the bill. Mrs Macquarie’s Point is the perfect location to get pictures of the Harbour (including the Harbour Bridge and Opera House) from the Southern Side.

 

  1. Pool of Siloam – Blue Mountains

 

If exploring the rainforest and finishing under a waterfall is your kind of idea of romance, than the Pool of Siloam at the Blue Mountains is perfect for you. It’s a super easy walk that only takes about half an hour to get to from the picnic area at Gordon Falls Reserve. So you can have a cute picnic lunch before trekking into the rainforest and swimming under waterfalls.

 

  1. Outdoor Table Tennis – Dee Why Beach
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Courtesy of weekendnotes.com

Dee Why Beach is a popular beach on Sydney’s North Shores. It hosts lots of sporting events as well as big New Years and Australia Day events. For Valentines Day, unleash your competitive side and slay your V-day buddy at a round of Table Tennis on the outdoor table tennis set.

 

A couple of weekends ago, I had the honour of attending a close friends wedding in Bendigo, Victoria. For those of you who don’t know, Bendigo is the fourth largest city in Victoria and is approximately 150kms northwest of Melbourne. In the months leading up to the wedding I was super excited for an excuse for a weekend away, thinking it’d be a nice chance for Henry and I to spend some time together before having to go back to work. It was about 6 weeks before the glorious day that we had an ‘oh shit’ moment as we realised we hadn’t booked any accommodation. We quickly hopped online and found a great deal with The Art Series Schaller Studio (highly recommend staying at any Art Series Hotel!) and booked 3 nights in Bendigo, thinking how cool it’d be if we could fit in a day trip to Melbourne.
After pondering the thought of Melbourne for a few hours, we decided to leave a day early and fit in a quick overnight stop in the hipster city. With only a short amount of time spare to spend in Melbourne, we made sure we didn’t waste a second of our time, and soon after arriving we were quickly off, ready to experience as much as we could in such a short frame of time.

Our trip was off to a busy start. I had to work that morning, so didn’t get home until about 1pm. But the second I pulled in the driveway, we quickly filled the car with our stuff, gave the cat a pat goodbye and set off for our nine hour drive. I’ve got to be honest, the drive from Thirroul (Sydney-ish) to Melbourne has got to be one of the most boring drives I’ve ever done! You’re literally on the same highway the entire way and it is just farmland surrounding you until you get about half an hour out of Melbourne.

We drove into Melbourne as the sun was setting (8:45pm!). Such a stunning entry into an equally stunning city – and a great first impression for Henry, who had never been to Melbourne before this trip.

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The sunset that lit up the sky just north of Melbourne.

We quickly checked into our hotel (Fraser Place – also recommend it!) and walked into the city, on the hunt for some food. Being close to 10pm we were thinking that fast food was going to be our only dinner option, but as we walked down Swanston Street we came across quite a lot of Asian cuisine restaurants which much to our glee were still open for business! We ended up googling reviews and chose to eat at China Bar, a 24 hour restaurant serving all different types of Asian cuisine at all hours of the day and night. We ordered steamed pork buns as an entrée, which were DELICIOUS! For dinner I had BBQ Pork (Cha Siew) on rice, which I had with a Lychee Juice. Both were amazing!

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BBQ Pork on rice. So good!

After an enjoyable meal, we strolled down to Federation Square and enjoyed the Melbourne Skyline in the dark before heading back to the hotel.

Although we were exhausted from the previous days drive, we were up at 8am the next morning, ready to pack in a day of sightseeing before heading out to Bendigo. We kick-started the day with a quick walk to the Queen Victoria Markets, where we enjoyed the best breakfast I think I’ve ever had! I had a big breakfast (sausages, eggs, bacon, roasted tomato, toast and a coffee). The meat was super fresh and it tasted so much better for it! After reluctantly finishing my meal (hey, I wanted it to last forever) we wandered around the market for a while. We didn’t end up buying anything – we came close to buying the cutest pair of baby ugg boots ever for a friend who is expecting, although realised that there would be little use for them in Perth – but it was nice to just have a sticky beak around at our own pace.

Being with an aspiring architect, getting lost in any concrete jungle is a given. After our market window-shopping, we walked around some of RMIT’s rather creative buildings that are sprawled all about the city. We even stepped inside the architecture building to scope out a feel.

We then decided it was time to tick another thing off our little ‘to-do’ list and headed towards Hosier Lane. Unfortunately, this took a while. Google Maps lied to us and led us to the opposite side of the city. It was super hot and we were getting tired, so it was lucky that we saw a T2 store where we were. We stepped inside the tea oasis and taste tested all the teas that were available. We were back in game. Eventually we did find Hosier Lane. At first sight, it was really cool but then as we stood closer to the wall all we could smell was piss. We then got super excited when we saw a café selling frozen Zooper Doopers – Winning! Although, our trip to Hosier Lane ended rather quickly when a junkie couple emerged from a dodgy side street yelling at random passers-by.

Disappointed in our premature departure of Hosier Lane, we wandered across the street and found ourselves at Pilgrim Bar, where we each shared a local handcrafted cider and enjoyed the spectacular view of Melbourne right in front of us. It was starting to creep into early afternoon, so we decided to leave Melbourne on a positive note and make our way towards Bendigo.

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Enjoying some sneaky ciders and a view before heading for our next destination.